Collections of the Elms

 The inkstand was formerly the property of Bishop Selwyn, and was gifted to Archdeacon Brown when Bishop Selwyn left New Zealand, to return to England. The Square Piano, c.1835. The keyboard is of ivory with ebony accidentals and moulded keyfronts in maple. The compass is six octaves, FF-f4, and the keyboard is contained in a rosewood-veneered key-well which is pierced to the right and left with decorative fretwork. The frame of the bed is made from Australian Cedar (toona australis), and has four carved posts and a carved headboard, with a cedar frame mounted on the top of the four posts, onto which a fabric canopy is mounted. The wooden frame or tester, around the top of the bed lifts off and the bed can be dismantled. Two panels each on every corner are removable, (they slip upwards and are held by hidden screws) and reveal bolts which require moving when taking apart. The bed legs are mounted onto castors. Four poster double bed c.1852-1856, brought to The Elms by Euphemia Ballingall Maxwell in 1888. The bed was made for Euphemia and her husband Reverend Andrew Maxwell when they ministered in a parish in Armidale, New South Wales, Australia. The tree the bed was made from was picked out by Euphemia, and the Scotch Chest just visible on the right hand side of this image was also made from this same tree. Square Pianoforte, with a case veneered in a lightly figured mahogany, a lid of solid mahogany affixed with two brass hinges and supported when open by two mahogany props. The keyboard is of ivory with ebony accidentals and moulded keyfronts in maple. The compass is six octaves, FF-f4, and the keyboard is contained in a rosewood-veneered key-well which is pierced to the right and left with decorative fretwork. The piano stands on four turned, reeded mahogany legs with brass castors. For a complete description, see Paul Downie's Restoration Report on the William Allen Piano, 2003, Document 1H. Maker's label reads: Medical field case brought from England by Reverend Brown in 1829.Sheffield silver plate Ewer, and Chalices made by James Dixon and Sons, c.1835.